Abortion
2012
Pencil on paper

Many contraceptive techniques proved of little value, and the next step was to induce abortion. Rhazes suggests various physical methods including the insertion into the vagina of a tube of paper or soft wood. This method remained a favourite, though highly dangerous device, until the twentieth century and up to World War Two and even later chemist were often asked to supply longs strips of quassia bark for this purpose. Knitting needles were also extensively used by amateur abortionists, though the risks of perforation of the uterus and resultant septicaemia were great.

Excerpt from ‘Magic, Myth and Medicine’ by John Camp (1973)
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Abortion
2012
Pencil on paper

Many contraceptive techniques proved of little value, and the next step was to induce abortion. Rhazes suggests various physical methods including the insertion into the vagina of a tube of paper or soft wood. This method remained a favourite, though highly dangerous device, until the twentieth century and up to World War Two and even later chemist were often asked to supply longs strips of quassia bark for this purpose. Knitting needles were also extensively used by amateur abortionists, though the risks of perforation of the uterus and resultant septicaemia were great.

Excerpt from ‘Magic, Myth and Medicine’ by John Camp (1973)
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer: